Category Archives: Petitions

Hands off our internet

The Right2Know Campaign calls on the public to reject the Film and Publications Board’s (FPB) proposals to censor the internet in South Africa.
The Right2Know Campaign calls on the public to reject the Film and Publications Board’s (FPB) proposals to censor the internet in South Africa.

The FPB wants broadly defined powers to police everything published on the Internet – including blogs, personal websites and Facebook pages. The scary thing is the FPB seem to actually believe their own B.S.

"Censorship is telling a man he can't have a steak because a baby can't chew it."
“Censorship is telling a man he can’t have a steak because a baby can’t chew it.”

 

Read more about the Right2Know campaign here and here.

Anonymous freedom speech quote

For years the FPB has been struggling to remain relevant, but like any animal that is cornered and can see it’s own mortality, they are at their most dangerous. Not only are they trying to censor the country,  they are trying to monetize the censorship. Nineteen eighty-four anyone? So the long version is the  FPB Draft policy  but ultimately attempting to get between the government and its money is probably not going to end well. We do what we can though.

Please sign the petition here, and make your voice heard.

The Public consultations are scheduled to take place as follows :

Gauteng: 28 May, Turbine Hall Newtown ,65 Ntemi Piliso Street, Johannesburg, 2001,17h00 – 19h00
Mpumalanga: 13 June 2015, Kanyamazne – Kanyamazane Hall, 11h00 – 13h00
Port Elizabeth: 20 June 2015, Feather Market Convention Centre – upper foyer, 11h00 – 13h00
Limpopo: 27 June 2015, Polokwane – University of Limpopo, 12h00 – 14h00
Kwa-Zulu Natal: 7 July 2015, Durban – ICC, 11h00 – 13h00
Western Cape: 25 July 2015, Khayelitsha TBC, 12h00 – 14h00

The Shore Break South African co-premiere at DIFF 2015

The Shore Break , is an award-winning film that unpacks the dilemma faced by a rural community on  South Africa’s Wild Coast as to whether to support or resist a proposed titanium mining project that  could fundamentally change their lives forever.
The Shore Break, is an award-winning film that unpacks the dilemma faced by a rural community on South Africa’s Wild Coast as to whether to support or resist a proposed titanium mining project that could fundamentally change their lives forever.

EDIT: Shore break wins Backsberg audience choice award

Accomplished, handsome documentary – VARIETY

Masterful storytelling  – SCENE CREEK

Riveting  – EXAMINER

 

To support the campaign to stop forced mining of the wild coast, please sign the petition at Avaaz . You can also like their facebook page and visit their website for more information.

 

The Shore Break tells the story of two cousins from South Africa’s Wild Coast have opposing plans to develop their land. Nonhle wants to develop eco-tourism in order to protect her community’s homes, farms, graves and traditional lifestyle while Madiba is planning a titanium mine and national tolled highway. Meanwhile, their King and Queen, who oppose the mine and highway, are deposed by the South African Government.

Directed by Ryley Grunenwald, The Shore Break was a selected project at the 2012 Durban FilmMart, the IDFA WorldView Summer School 2013, the Hot Docs Forum 2012 and the Hot Docs Dealmakers 2013.

Director of The Shore Break Ryley Grunenwald
Director of The Shore Break Ryley Grunenwald

 

It is co-produced by two South African companies, Grunenwald’s Johannesburg based Marie-Vérité Films and Odette Geldenhuys’ Cape Town-based frank films. It was in competition at the recent International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam (IDFA), and was named the Best Feature Length Documentary at the 2015 International Environmental Film Festival (FIFE) in Paris.

 

Elder and herbalist Mr. Samson Gampe
Elder and herbalist Mr. Samson Gampe
Nonhle Mbuthuma on her land which her cousin plans to mine
Nonhle Mbuthuma on her land which her cousin plans to mine
Exquisitely filmed with arresting cinematography, The Shore Break
is edited by Kerryn Assaizky, features original songs by traditional local musician Ntombe Thongo, and sand animation by award-winning animator Justine Puren-Calverley. The almost Kentridgesque animation links sections and propositions in the film, subtly providing context and silent commentary, creating opportunities for the audience to reflect and muse.